Many paths lead to the Creator, continued from Part 1 which introduced Jnana Yoga and Karma Yoga.

For those who want to control themselves and master their instincts and impulses and the tendencies of their lower nature, there is Raja-yoga: through concentration and self-control, they too seek to lose themselves in the Almighty. They become the kings (raja means king) of their own inner kingdom.

Kriya-yoga is the yoga of light. This is the yoga of the great Babaji, and it consists in thinking of light, of getting to know and understand light and colours, and of drawing them into oneself and projecting them all around. It is a magnificent way to work.

Hatha-yoga is for those who want physical exercise, who enjoy adopting the postures or asanas as they are called: they twist and turn and roll themselves into balls, stretch out, lie flat on their stomach, stand upright, fold their legs behind their heads and so on. These exercises are based on a detailed knowledge of the psychic centres which are activated by the different postures, and they require a great deal of will and perseverance.

Hatha-yoga is the type of yoga most widely known in the West. Unfortunately, however, Westerners do not have the same temperament or constitution as Orientals. Neither do they have the necessary conditions of calm and silence to practise Hatha-yoga correctly, with the result that it often leads to a physical or psychic breakdown.

Many, many people have told me that they abandoned the practice of Hatha-yoga because they felt that it was making them unbalanced. If you want to practise it you must go about it with great prudence and care; I have never recommended this type of yoga for Westerners.

Agni-yoga is the yoga of fire in which one thinks of fire, works with fire and kindles the fire within. Since fire is at the origin of the whole of creation, Agni-yoga is yet another path to God.

Shabda- or Mantra-yoga is the yoga of the Word. It consists of pronouncing certain formulas or mantras at certain specific moments, a certain number of times, with a certain degree of intensity. Words possess power, and he who knows how to use that power can obtain beneficial results.

And now I want to talk to you about a form of yoga which surpasses all others: the yoga of the sun. This form of yoga was well known in the past; the Greeks and Egyptians practised it, as did also the Persians, Aztecs, Mayas and Tibetans. But nowadays it is almost abandoned, especially in the Western world.

The name ‘Surya-yoga’ comes from the Sanskrit word for sun: Surya. This is the type of yoga I prefer above all others, for it includes and sums up all others. Yes, why not combine all the different types of yoga into one?

Omraam Mikhaël Aïvanhov
The Bonfin, 31 July 1967

To be continued..

Complete Works, Volume 10, The Splendour of Tiphareth
Chapter 1, The Sun, Centre of our Universe